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Doctoral Alumni Recognition Ceremony
Doctoral Alumni Recognition Ceremony

The Wall of Honor Ceremony recognizes the professional achievements of alumni who received their doctorate 10, 25 and 50 years ago. The Wall of Honor, located in the lobby of Kern Graduate Building, is updated annually with the names of alumni who received their doctorate 50 years ago. At present, the Wall of Honor displays the names of more than 3,000 alumni.

Graduate Exhibition Award Winners
Graduate Exhibition Awards

More than 200 graduate students participated in the 2017 Graduate Exhibition which included 220 graduate student participants in the research poster presentation option, 10 in the visual arts option, 10 in the performance option, and five in the video option. More than 170 individuals also volunteered to serve as judges. 

Penn State graduate student Julie Fenton selected to meet with Nobel Laureates
Penn State graduate student Julie Fenton selected to meet with Nobel Laureates

Penn State chemistry graduate student Julie Fenton has been selected to participate in the 67th Lindau Nobel Laureate Meeting, during which she will interact with Nobel Laureates at Lake Constance in Germany. 

Penn State continues to perform well in U.S. News graduate school rankings
Penn State continues to perform well in U.S. News graduate school rankings

Penn State’s graduate school programs continue to perform well in the annual U.S. News & World Report “Best Graduate Schools” rankings, the latest of which were announced March 14.

The Graduate School in the News
April 20, 2017
Inaugural Great Valley poster fair brings visibility to diverse student research
Undergraduate and graduate engineering students recently created posters, presented research, and competed for cash prizes at Penn State Great Valley’s inaugural Research and Scholarly Work Poster Fair.
April 20, 2017
Disease-associated genes routinely missed in some genetic studies
Whole-exome DNA sequencing -- a technology that saves time and money by sequencing only protein-coding regions and not the entire genome -- may routinely miss detecting some genetic variations associated with disease, according to Penn State researchers who have developed new ways to identify such omissions.
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