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Graduate Program Proposal Requirements - Procedure

Procedure for Programs and Curriculum Policy GCAC-206

Policy

GCAC-206 Graduate Program Proposal Requirements

Procedure

  1. General Procedures for All Graduate Program Proposals
    1. Submit one (1) original, signed proposal form and 2 copies of the complete graduate program proposal document, with a copy of the signed proposal form attached to each proposal copy, to the Dean's office, 211 Kern.
    2. All program proposals must be consecutively paginated from start to finish, including the evidence of consultation. In addition, a table of contents must be included in the proposal document.
    3. Prepare the proposal document in the outline format as shown below. The proposer is reminded that the members of the Graduate Council Joint Curricular Committee may not have knowledge of the field and is encouraged to provide as much documentation as possible for the reviewers.
  2. New Program, Option, and Minor Proposals

    New Program, Option (see GCAC-207 Degree Program Options), and Minor Proposals must contain the following:

    1. A short description of the program for public release. This description will be reviewed by the Provost and the Board of Trustees.
    2. A justification for the program. The proposal should include a statement regarding the necessity for the program, i.e., why the program should be offered; and information on the ability of the department to offer a quality program. Included in the section should be the projected size of the program and its impact on current course offerings and faculty load as well as additional faculty advising duties.
    3. The objectives of the program. The proposal should include an explanation of how the proposal meets the new educational objectives and/or strengthens existing programs of the college(s) and the University; what students may expect to accomplish through the new program; and a statement of how the new offering does not duplicate other degree programs within the department/college/University.
    4. A list of Program Learning Objectives. A graduate program’s learning objectives should reflect the Graduate Council Scholarly and Professional Goals for All Graduate Students. For each Program Learning Objective listed, state how it links to one or more of the five Scholarly and Professional Goals.
    5. A justification for the degree title used (see policy GCAC-217). The academic degree titles (M.S., M.A., Ph.D.) are to be used only for degree programs that are research-oriented. A professional degree title will be more appropriate for programs that, for example, emphasize practical application of knowledge; programs that emphasize professional development for advancement in specific careers but with a more practitioner orientation; programs that prepare students for licensure in a given field; and master's programs that are not intended to prepare students for doctoral study. If a professional master’s degree is being proposed, the degree title Master of Professional Studies (M.P.S.) should be used, unless a different degree title is well established nationally. If a professional degree title other than M.P.S. is proposed, evidence must be provided that the degree title is nationally established. This evidence could include existence of an accrediting body or a list of existing programs already using the degree title.
    6. A list of new courses to be established as a part of the new offering.
    7. A complete program statement. This should be an arrangement of courses in accordance with degree requirements, as well as non-course degree requirements for each degree proposed to be offered, and with identification of the pattern of scheduling. A list of the required courses, typical electives, etc., that will logically be taken by a student enrolling in the new program should be included. Courses being newly proposed should be distinguished from existing courses. The proposal must include a copy of the Bulletin description in a format suitable for inclusion in the Graduate Degree Programs Bulletin. A statement of admission requirements must be included, i.e., required test scores, minimum jr./sr. GPA, as deemed appropriate by the proposer.
    8. Accreditation: The proposal document must include information regarding any accrediting body for the proposed program area, i.e., is there an accrediting body or board (if so, please identify); or, if appropriate to the field, whether the program will prepare students for licensure in the field. Programs for which accreditation exists must pursue and achieve full accreditation.
    9. Original written responses from departments affected, either by potential overlapping content or audience or by potential opportunities for collaboration (received during consultation phase).
    10. Written evidence of consultation with the Office for Research Protections regarding SARI requirements.
  3. Program Change Proposals

    Proposals outlining changes to an existing graduate program must contain the following:

    1. A justification for proposed changes, such as updating instruction, together with an indication of expected enrollments and any effects on existing programs.
    2. A list of Program Learning Objectives*. A graduate program’s learning objectives should reflect the Graduate Council Scholarly and Professional Goals for All Graduate Students. For each Program Learning Objective listed, state how it links to one or more of the five Scholarly and Professional Goals.
    3. A revised version of the affected area showing both the old program requirements and the new program requirements (so that the reviewers can determine what specifically is being changed). The proposal should include a side-by-side comparison of admission requirements, number of credits required, specific courses to be taken, etc. A copy of the existing Graduate Bulletin description, with all changes marked (with track changes, for example), also must be included.
    4. Original written responses from departments affected, either by potential overlapping content or audience or by potential opportunities for collaboration (received during consultation phase).
    5. Written evidence of consultation with the Office for Research Protections regarding SARI requirements, as necessary, depending on the nature of the proposed change(s). For example, addition of a new degree would require such consultation, but changes to existing degree requirements may not, unless the changes affect previously approved SARI requirements for the program.
  4. Program Drop Proposals

    Proposals for the termination of an existing graduate program must contain the following:

    1. A justification for the requested drop.
    2. A copy of the existing Graduate Bulletin description, with all changes marked (with track changes, for example), as applicable. If the entire graduate program or minor is being dropped, it is not necessary to include a revised Bulletin description, but if an option is being dropped, the revised Bulletin description is required.
    3. Original written responses from departments affected by the proposed drop.
  5. Proposals for M.A. and M.S. Degrees

    Traditionally, the Master of Arts (M.A.) and the Master of Science (M.S.) degrees have been strongly oriented towards research and the creation of new knowledge. In the past, these degrees often served as the first step towards the research doctorate. As employers look to hire more individuals with advanced research training beyond the baccalaureate, and as new delivery methods expand the potential for students to successfully enroll in and complete Penn State graduate degrees, it is essential to ensure that M.A. and M.S. degree programs maintain Penn State’s reputation as a world-class research university and reflect its research mission, while enabling the University to meet the expanding needs of the workforce and be competitive with other institutions. The following guidelines for the M.A. and M.S. degrees are meant to ensure these programs meet essential standards of quality. All new program and program change proposals submitted must include a description of how the program will meet these requirements. All proposals for M.A. and M.S. degree programs must include evidence of:

    1. the active participation of tenure-line and/or research-active faculty in overseeing and teaching in the program;
    2. a low student/adviser ratio, with a high degree of one-on-one interaction;
    3. course work on research methodology and analysis;
    4. the same standards for the M.A. and M.S. degrees regardless of delivery method; and
    5. a culminating experience for the M.A. and M.S. degrees that demonstrates students have the capacity to conduct research, scholarly analysis, or creative scholarly investigations, and effectively communicate their scholarship.
  6. Requirements for a Proposal to Adopt a Dual-Title Graduate Degree Program (see GCAC-208 Dual-Title Graduate Degree Programs)

    A graduate program change proposal to adopt a dual-title graduate degree program must address the following:

    1. A listing of typical courses available (approved course title and course abbreviation/number) that are appropriate for the dual-title area of study should be provided.
    2. A statement should be made regarding the minimum number of 500- or 800-level (or maximum number, in the case of 400-level) credits that must be taken in the dual-title area of study.
    3. Administrative processes by which students will be admitted to and matriculate in the dual-title degree program in a coordinated manner with the graduate program must be delineated.
  7. Requirements for New Extended or New Off-Campus Degree Programs and Extended or Off-Campus Delivery of Existing Degree Programs (see GCAC-213 Residency and Related Policies for Off-Campus Degree Programs)
    1. Justification statement including: 1) evidence of demand for the program in the new location, with market survey data if appropriate; 2) the projected size of the program and its anticipated duration; 3) evidence concerning the academic unit's ability to offer a quality program in an off-campus environment; 4) a statement demonstrating the impact of the proposed new program or off-campus delivery of an existing program on other programs (undergraduate and graduate) offered by the academic unit (and in particular, on faculty load), as well as on programs offered by other units; and 5) a statement indicating fiscal responsibility for the program.
    2. A program description in a format for the Graduate Bulletin that includes the following: 1) a statement of admission requirements, e.g., standardized test scores, GPA, recommendations, etc. (Note - Admissions criteria for off-campus degree programs must be the same as those for the same degree program offered to students in residence); 2) complete degree requirements; 3) a list of required courses. In addition, a description of the course sequence and typical scheduling pattern should be provided, but need not be part of the Bulletin description. For proposals involving off-campus delivery of existing degree programs, if any changes to admission or degree requirements are being proposed as a result of off-campus delivery, a side-by-side comparison of the existing program requirements and the revised requirements must be provided, along with a statement justifying all proposed revisions; such proposals will undergo the full Graduate Council curricular review process.
    3. A statement demonstrating how the essential elements of residency (as defined in GCAC-213 Residency and Related Policies for Off-Campus Graduate Programs) will be achieved for off-campus programs. Three years after program inception a report must be made to the Graduate Council Committee on Programs and Courses that provides evidence concerning how the essential elements of residency have actually been incorporated into the program and demonstrates that high-quality graduate education has been delivered in the off-campus program (see GCAC-213 Checklist for Programs Off-site/Online Program 3-Year Follow-Up Reports). During this three-year period, the Graduate School is charged with monitoring program delivery and quality.
    4. Program operation and maintenance including: 1) identification of a program director who must be a member of the graduate faculty in the academic unit offering the degree; 2) evidence of how academic advising, counseling, and learning support will be provided to students; 3) description of available facilities including research facilities, libraries, technological resources, etc.; and 4) a statement regarding any technological resources and related specifications that students will be expected to have (e.g., laptop and specifications for operating system, camera, etc.; internet access specifications; etc.).
    5. Written responses indicating consultation with other units affected by or that potentially would have interest in the proposed program. In addition, if the program is to be offered online or use technology as the primary delivery method to serve off-campus students, the World Campus must be consulted at the earliest possible stage of program development and a letter of consultation must be provided from the World Campus Director of Academic Affairs for Graduate Programs.
    6. Off-campus programs must incorporate a mechanism for assessing program quality through student surveys for feedback at critical milestones in the program as well as a student exit questionnaire at the time of graduation.

    Additional Requirements for New Extended or New Off-Campus Degree Programs

    1. Objectives of the program including: 1) an explanation of how the new program meets the educational objectives and/or strengthens existing programs of the college(s) and the University; 2) an explanation of why this program is appropriate for off-campus delivery; 3) a description of what students may expect to accomplish through the new program; and 4) a statement of how the new offering does not unnecessarily duplicate other degree programs.
    2. A list of new courses to be established as a part of the new degree program.

    Additional Requirements for Online Graduate Courses and Graduate Degree Programs, Hybrid Graduate Courses, and Blended Graduate Degree Programs

    Information technology available in the 21st century has presented higher education with a host of new educational opportunities. Accompanying them, however, are a host of potential issues. Key among them is the issue of maintaining a high standard of instructor-student engagement in graduate education. In determining the standards for instructor-student engagement, a number of factors need to be taken into account.

    1. Technology-enhanced graduate education can come in many forms, such as: resident courses supplemented by information technology applications; blended learning formats that involve some resident and some online students in the same “classroom”; completely online courses.
    2. Online education does not necessarily mean asynchronous and self-paced learning, or the absence of instructor-student interaction.
    3. While technology provides myriad opportunities to enhance education, it is up to the instructor and standards groups to choose the best way to deploy the technology.

    For students enrolled in off-campus degree programs, and eligible for and seeking federal financial aid, the Federal Register requires “significant instructor-initiated interaction” for courses to qualify as distance education (versus correspondence courses), including online courses. Proposals that involve distance-delivery of courses must describe the kinds of instructor-initiated interaction that will occur in each course, including: mode of communication, frequency of communication, and expectations for student responses. Proposals must describe all student course deliverables and graded artifacts for the course. Proposals also must describe any special considerations needed in order to comply with the Americans with Disabilities Act (for example, audio or video content or interactive web content).

  8. Elements of Proposals for Collaborative Graduate Degree Programs (see GCAC-214 Collaborative Graduate Education Programs with Institutions Outside of the United States)

    Programs must first determine which of the two allowable models indicated in GCAC-214 Collaborative Graduate Education Programs with Institutions Outside of the United States will be proposed for the collaborative international program. Once the model has been selected, a detailed proposal containing the information listed below must be developed and submitted for review and approval by Graduate Council. The proposal must include a justification for the offering; information on program administration and coordination; and program-specific recruitment, admission and degree requirements. The following elements, A to H, must be included in the proposal, adapted to either of the two models selected (CI-CGDP or CI-IUGDP):

    1. Cover Sheets. Creation of a CI-CGDP or CI-IUGDP constitutes a program change which requires that a proposal be submitted for the curricular review process and approval by Graduate Council.
    2. Justification. The justification for proposing a collaborative program must include the following information:
      1. Motivation for creating the collaborative program. This should include information that addresses:
        1. Need for the offering and market demand. Provide estimates of how many students will participate in the offering per year and over the first five-year period of program operation if approved.
        2. Statement on how the proposed collaborative offering fits into the mission of the graduate program and/or college.
        3. Explanation of the value added by having a formal collaboration beyond existing means to provide students with an international experience.
        4. A brief description of the academic nature of the collaborative program, including model selected, (i.e., Concurrent Degree or Integrated Undergraduate-Graduate Degree Program).
      2. Program/Institution Quality: Because approval for a collaborative graduate program affords the international institution special privileges not available otherwise (e.g., double-counting of courses towards both degrees; exception to the limit of 10 credits that can be transferred into a graduate degree program), collaborative programs are limited to institutions of appropriate stature.
        1. Name, location, and nature of the institution and specific academic unit with which the Penn State graduate program is proposing to collaborate.
        2. Quality of the collaborating institution (documented evidence of the quality of the international institution; include any ranking or rating by a recognized, qualified, independent entity or accrediting body).
        3. Quality of the specific academic program to be included in the collaboration. Include specific metrics/indicators, for example: how selective is the program in admitting graduates/undergraduates (i.e., number of applications versus number of offers of admission)? What is the yield (number of acceptances versus number of offers)? What is the median GPA of admitted students? What are the median standardized test scores (if appropriate) of admitted students? Other quality indicators?
        4. Indicators of faculty quality at the collaborating institution.

        NOTE: Faculty serving on Penn State graduate student committees must be approved as Special Members or qualified for graduate faculty membership (see GCAC-100 Graduate Faculty Membership); and if teaching Penn State graduate courses must members of the Graduate Faculty or receive special approval to teach a graduate course.

      3. Compatibility between the collaborating institution and the Penn State system
        1. Verification from Graduate Enrollment Services of the equivalency of the undergraduate degree offered by the collaborating institution (i.e., does the collaborating institution offer an a four-year undergraduate degree program equivalent to a Penn State baccalaureate degree? Is the institution accredited or recognized by the appropriate body within their country?).
        2. Equivalency of course credits in terms of class contact hours, out-of-class effort, grading scale, etc.
        3. Alignment of the academic calendars. For example, is the collaborating institution on a semester versus term or other system (if so, what system), and what is the comparability in terms of length of the instructional period and starting/ending dates for each?
        4. Curricular description of the relevant programs of study offered at the collaborating institution.
        5. Compatibility/potential for integration of the programs: Identify any significant cultural and educational differences, if any; address how these may affect students’ success in the program and how these will be managed/reconciled.
      4. Program Administration and Coordination
        1. Outline plans for administration and coordination of the program. (The proposal must include a designated coordinator to oversee the collaborative program, and specify a procedure to ensure the terms of the agreement are met.) Programs are cautioned that failure to sustain detailed oversight and record keeping of such complex entities may compromise students’ ability to complete the program.
        2. Describe resources needed to create and maintain the program (staffing, administrative costs, student funding, etc.), including any additional fees or differential tuition rate that may be justified given the need for greater, more complex institutional support.
        3. Describe the marketing plan for the collaborative program.
        4. Describe the general nature of participation of faculty from the collaborating institution, including teaching responsibilities for Penn State courses, serving on graduate student committees, etc.
        5. Describe mechanisms for sustaining the collaborative program and a pre-planned schedule and criteria for assessment of success/limitations. NOTE: A “sunset clause” for the collaborative program should be established; i.e., it is recommended that agreements be established for a five-year period, with periodic review and renewal.
        6. Specify the delivery method for the program (e.g., in residence; distance learning (describe method of delivery such as video-conferencing); blended (describe); fully online via the World Campus; etc.). NOTE: Programs not previously approved for off-campus delivery of the graduate degree program must address required guidelines for approval of such delivery as well. (See GCAC-213 Residency and Related Policies for Off-Campus Degree Programs.)
      5. Model-Specific Program Recruitment, Admissions and Degree Requirements

        Specify the model selected for the program collaboration and provide information related to recruitment, admissions and degree requirements for that particular model, i.e., either a Collaborative International-Concurrent Graduate Degree Program (CI-CGDP) or a Collaborative International-Integrated Undergraduate-Graduate Degree Program (CI-IUGDP). It is important to carefully and thoroughly review the specific guidelines for the respective model selected (CI-CGDP, Appendix A1; CI-IUGDP, Appendix A2), and include all of the information required, as appropriate for that model. A summary of the elements to be included for each model are as follows:

        1. Timing of Recruitment and Admission
        2. Criteria for Admission
        3. Degree Requirements and Plan of Study
        4. Other Program Requirements
        5. List of Courses to be Transferred From the Collaborating Institution to the Penn State Degree
        6. Student-Specific Expectations
        7. Degree Conferral
        8. Graduate Student Handbook Statement

        IMPORTANT NOTES:

        For admission to the Graduate School, an applicant must hold either (1) a bachelor's degree from a U.S. regionally accredited institution or (2) a postsecondary degree that is equivalent to a U.S. baccalaureate degree earned from an officially recognized degree-granting international institution. An academic unit proposing a CI-IUGDP program must consult with the Office of Graduate Enrollment Services in the Graduate School and include a confirmation from that office that the degree offered by the collaborating institution meets this requirement. Similarly, the baccalaureate/post-secondary degree held by applicants to a CI-CGDP must meet this requirement.

        International applicants must take and submit scores for the TOEFL (Test of English as a Foreign Language) or the IELTS (International English Language Testing System), and meet the established minimum scores required by the Graduate School and graduate program with the exception of individuals who have received a baccalaureate or a master's degree from a college/university/institution in any of the following: Australia, Belize, British Caribbean and British West Indies, Canada (except Quebec), England, Guyana, Republic of Ireland, Liberia, New Zealand, Northern Ireland, Scotland, the United States, and Wales, per Graduate Council policies. (See GCAC-305 Admission Requirements for International Students.)

        For both program models, the proposal to be submitted refers to a standing offering that will be created within an existing Penn State graduate program, and that must be approved through curricular review by Graduate Council.

      6. Funding Mechanisms and Logistics

        Describe how students enrolled in the collaborative program will be supported. Is the collaborative program projected to be fully revenue-generating? Are assistantships available for student support at both institutions?

      7. Consultation

        Evidence of consultation with other relevant Penn State units also may be required. Collaborations involving incoming international students should be reviewed at an early stage by the UOGP’s Directorate of International Student Advising. Other offices which can provide valuable advice, and whose approval may be required, are the University Registrar, Office of the Bursar, Office of Undergraduate Education, and the World Campus (in particular, the Director of Academic Affairs for Graduate Programs). In some cases, such as where issues of technology transfer or intellectual property are implicated, review by the Office of Sponsored Programs or General Counsel’s office also may be required. If the proposed program may affect another academic unit at Penn State, such as when there is an existing Penn State collaboration at the overseas institution, that unit also should be consulted. The UOGP and Graduate School can provide guidance on appropriate review and consultation.

    3. For Collaborative International-Concurrent Graduate Degree Programs (CI-CGDP), the following must be included in the program proposal:
      1. Timing of Recruitment & Admission: Indicate the timing for recruitment to the CI-CGDP (e.g., will the concurrent program be marketed to prospective students as a “package” or will applicants to each institution be admitted to the respective degree program first and then recruited into the CI-CGDP?). What will be the sequence/timing of attendance at Penn State versus the collaborating institution? If admission is not on a rolling basis, indicate the timing of admission of new CI-CGDP students into the Penn State degree (e.g., fall semester each year). Specify how and when Penn State faculty will participate in the admissions process at the collaborating institution and vice versa.
      2. Criteria for Admission to the CI-CGDP: Describe the requirements for admission into the CI-CGDP, consistent with a high degree of selectivity in the admissions process. Admission criteria must specify that students must apply to and meet admission requirements of the Penn State graduate program in which they intend to receive their graduate degree.
      3. Degree Requirements & Plan of Study: Provide a side-by-side comparison of the graduate degree requirements for students in the Penn State graduate program alone versus the Penn State graduate program in the context of the CI-CGDP, including a clear indication of the specific courses and number of credits derived from the collaborative graduate degree that will be double-counted for the Penn State degree. The complete plan of study for both the Penn State and collaborator concurrent degrees, including which specific courses will be double-counted (applied to both degrees), should be delineated by completing the “Collaborative International-Graduate Degree Program Plan of Study Form” and attaching the form to the proposal. Any common agreements, such as the required completion of a specific portion/sequence of courses for one program before advancing to begin the other, should be noted in the stated plan of study.
      4. Other Program Requirements: Delineate any other program requirements (beyond courses) that involve or are contributed by the collaborating institution (e.g., if concurrent Penn State Ph.D. and collaborator M.S. degrees are to be offered, what is the culminating experience [thesis, scholarly paper, etc.] required for the partner M.S.?).
      5. List of Courses: Include a list of courses required for both collaborating institutions for the CI-CGDP. Courses from a collaborating international institution to be consistently transferred into the Penn State graduate degree and double-counted must be specified by completing the “Collaborative International Graduate Degree Program Transfer of Credit Form” and attaching the form to the CI-CGDP proposal. Course credits from the collaborating institution to be double-counted must be equivalent to course credits at Penn State.
      6. Student-Specific Expectations: Specify student-specific expectations, including expected time to degree for the entire collaborative program. (Note: Student-specific expectations of units offering a collaborative program must be included in the program’s Graduate Student Handbook).
      7. Degree Conferral: Proposals should state that the expected timing of degree conferral for both degrees is at the completion of the entire CI-CGDP, and articulate a statement to be included in all program materials, including the Graduate Student Handbook, that confirm that if all of the requirements for one degree are satisfied before those of the other degree, and if these meet the requirements for the degree when not offered as a concurrent program, then that degree may be conferred in cases where the student may not be able to complete the second degree.
      8. Graduate Student Handbook: Proposals for CI-CGDPs should include the section of the Graduate Student Handbook related to the CI-CGDP, and should articulate a statement to be included in all program materials that confirm that if all of the requirements for one degree are satisfied before those of the other degree and if these meet the requirements for the degree when not offered as a concurrent program, then that degree may be conferred in cases where the student may not be able to complete the second degree.
    4. For Collaborative International-Integrated Undergraduate-Graduate Degree Programs (CI-IUGDP), the following must be included in the program proposal:
      1. Timing of Recruitment & Admission: Indicate when in the undergraduate degree program students will be recruited and admitted to the CI-IUGDP. Students should have progressed sufficiently in their undergraduate programs to demonstrate their potential to successfully meet the considerable demands of a CI-IUGDP, typically after completing at least two years of undergraduate study. In order to avoid expectations that admission into the undergraduate degree program guarantees admission into the graduate program, students should not be recruited into a CI-IUGDP prior to admission into the undergraduate program. If admission is not on a rolling basis, indicate the timing of admission of new students into the CI-IUGDP (e.g., fall semester each year). Specify how Penn State faculty will participate in the admissions process at the point where the students are to be considered for the collaborative program.
      2. Criteria for Admission: Describe the requirements for admission into the CI-IUGDP, consistent with a high degree of selectivity. Admission criteria must specify that students must apply to and meet admission requirements of the Penn State graduate program in which they intend to receive their graduate degree. Students selected to participate in the CI-IUGDP must be recommended and endorsed in writing by appropriate faculty of the international institution and must complete Penn State’s graduate application, pay the application fee, meet the Graduate School’s minimum requirements for admission (see GCAC-301 Qualifications for Admission) and the admission requirements of the graduate program to which the student is applying, and be approved for admission at Penn State.
      3. Degree Requirements and Plan of Study: Provide a side-by-side comparison of the graduate degree requirements for students in the graduate program alone versus in the CI-IUGDP, including a clear indication of the specific courses and number of credits derived from the undergraduate degree and graduate degree respectively, which will be double-counted for both degrees. In the case of courses to be double-counted from the undergraduate program, specify the designated course number and title at the collaborating institution; the equivalent Penn State course level (e.g., 400- or graduate (500/800) level) and if graduate level, whether equivalent to 500 or 800 (professionally oriented) graduate courses; and equivalent credits on a semester basis.

        NOTE: Course credits from the collaborating institution to be double-counted must be equivalent to course credits at Penn State. As many as twelve of the credits required for the master's degree may be double-counted (applied to both undergraduate and graduate degree programs), with a minimum of 6 credits required to be double-counted. At least 50% of the course credits proposed to count for both degrees must be at the graduate (500- or 800-) level. The thesis or other culminating/capstone experience and any related credits (e.g., SUBJECT 600, THESIS RESEARCH) may not be double- counted.

      4. Other Program Requirements: Delineate any other program requirements (beyond courses) that involve or are contributed by the collaborating institution. (For example, if an undergraduate thesis or other culminating experience is required for the undergraduate degree, describe.)
      5. List of Courses: Include a list of courses required for both collaborating institutions for the CI-IUGDP. Courses from a collaborating international institution to be consistently transferred into the Penn State graduate degree and double-counted must be specified by completing the “Collaborative International Graduate Degree Program Transfer of Credit Form” and attaching the form to the CI-IUGDP proposal. Course credits from the collaborating institution to be double-counted must be equivalent to course credits at Penn State. Students should be directed to first fulfill basic undergraduate requirements so that if, for some reason, they cannot continue in the integrated program they will be able to receive their undergraduate degree without a significant loss of time.
      6. Student-Specific Expectations: Specify student-specific expectations including expected time to degree for the entire collaborative program. (Note: Student-specific expectations of units offering a collaborative program must be included in the program’s Graduate Student Handbook.)
      7. Degree Conferral: Proposals must reflect that the undergraduate degree must be conferred at least one semester prior to the conferral of the graduate degree, and the original undergraduate diploma must be presented to Graduate Enrollment Services for verification. Proposals must also articulate a statement to be included in all program materials, including the Graduate Student Handbook, that confirms that if all of the requirements for the undergraduate degree are satisfied before those of the graduate degree, and if these meet the requirements for the undergraduate degree when not offered as an integrated program, then the undergraduate degree may be conferred in cases where the student may not be able to complete the graduate degree.
      8. Graduate Student Handbook: Proposals for CI-IUGDPs should include the text for the section of the Graduate Student Handbook related to the CI-IUGDP, which should articulate a statement to be included in all program materials that confirms that if all of the requirements for the undergraduate degree are satisfied before those of the graduate degree, and if these meet the requirements for the undergraduate degree when not offered as an integrated program, then the undergraduate degree may be conferred in cases where the student may not be able to complete the graduate degree.
  9. Graduate Course Proposal Procedures
    1. All graduate course proposals must be initiated in the Curriculum Review and Consultation System (CRCS), and all consultation on each course proposal must be obtained via CRCS. No hardcopy submission of graduate course proposals is required at any point in the Graduate Council curricular review process.
    2. After a new course proposal has been approved through level 7 (review on behalf of the Dean of the Graduate School), it will be included on the next meeting agenda of the Graduate Council Joint Curricular Committee. After each Joint Curricular Committee meeting, feedback from the Committee is entered directly into the course proposal in CRCS and the proposal is returned to the proposer via CRCS for further action. The proposer’s response via CRCS is required.
    3. Course change proposals and course drop proposals undergo expedited review on behalf of the Joint Curricular Committee. The timing of this review is not dependent upon the monthly meeting dates of the Joint Curricular Committee. However, if there are any issues or concerns about these proposals, they may be forwarded to the co-chairs or the Joint Curricular Committee for full review.
    4. After approval by the Graduate Council Joint Curricular Committee, course proposals are published in the Graduate Council Curriculum Report; a 30-day comment period follows publication. New courses are effective the semester following the expiration of the comment period.

Forms

Graduate Council Program, Option, or Minor Proposal Form

Further Information

GCAC-206 Graduate Program Proposal Requirements

Overview of the Graduate Council Curricular Review Process

Developing Graduate Program Proposals

Graduate Course Proposal Submission

Curriculum Review and Consultation System (CRCS)

Revision History

Prepared by the Committee on Programs and Courses, 1996
Revised by the Committee on Programs and Courses, 2003
Revised by the Committee on Programs and Courses, 2008
Revised by the Committee on Programs and Courses, 2014
Revised by the Committee on Programs and Courses, 2018
Revised by The Graduate School, 2018

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